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HPM September 2017

3 E D I T O R ’ S C OMME N T “...modern appliances are far more sophisticated than their equivalents of even a decade ago” When installing or servicing a domestic heating appliance or system, gas heating engineers are liable for all of the work they carry out. This liability extends to any replacement parts they purchase and fit. And if a problem occurs as a result of using fake boiler parts the installer also has to take full responsibility. So news that the Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering and Baxi have joined forces with law firm, Emms Gilmore Liberson, to try and stamp out potentially deadly counterfeit boiler parts from entering the market and being fitted in homes across the country is welcome news. The initiative has been launched after it has been revealed that imports of counterfeits and pirated goods are worth half a trillion dollars a year – with many now turning up in UK homes. Although the cost of genuine parts will obviously be dearer, the added expense is a small price to pay. The truth is that only the use of genuine parts will restore the boiler to its original factory condition. And that is surely the point of any repair, isn’t it? If the fake parts you are installing keep failing, not only will you have the added expense of replacing them again, but valuable time is wasted returning to the original job. If word gets around that your work is continually not up to scratch, your reputation as a professional tradesmen will also be severely damaged. And your reputation is everything. However, the most important aspect to all of this is safety. Modern heating appliances are far more sophisticated than their equivalents of even a decade ago. The condensing boiler, for example, contains a high-efficiency burner and heat exchanger, gas, water and mains electricity – a potentially dangerous combination which must be controlled safely. And that is not taking into account the complex controls required to work the boiler, cycling on and off millions of times over a significant temperature range as the boiler heats up and cools down. Given these complexities and of course the risks involved, is it worth using that fake part, that hasn’t been through the rigorous testing process, or made of the correct material, in your boiler? I suspect that the answer is no. The message is simple – stay fake free, stay out of trouble. Tim Wood Editor enquiry number 302


HPM September 2017
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