076 HPM 1115

HPM November 2015

BOILERS:LIGHTCOMMERCIAL Light commercial opportunities abound The light commercial heating market is one full of opportunity for installers who can think creatively in the way they approach it, according to Jim Bennett, sales and marketing director at Smiths Fan Convectors... Light commercial projects cover a range of buildings that at first glance often have more in common with a domestic dwelling than a heavy commercial setting. Typically, a number of domestic boilers are installed and the heat emitters that go with it can often be the default setting of panel radiators to go with it. In light commercial settings, however, the low floor installation position of a radiator does not usually lend itself to the more flexible demands of the premises. Equally, in some light commercial settings, such as places of worship, panel radiators take such a long time to get up to temperature to then be useful for a relatively short period of time that the heating bills make such installations unattractive and uncompetitive for the end user. Canny installers will make sure they have fan convectors in their repertoire for their light commercial customers. The flexible siting options alone make the fan convector an invaluable option for an end user who needs to put filing cabinets and desks along its walls. A POWERFUL OPTION Fan convectors can be sited low on the wall, of course, but they can also easily be installed high on the ceiling, above doors, or on, or in, the ceiling. Fan convectors can also be completely concealed inside walls or ceilings to meet the needs of the aesthetics of a building, which can be a powerful option for older buildings requiring brand new central heating. Smith’s had a project recently at Blackpool Zoo where the training room required new heat emitters and the contractor specified five Ecovector High 4000s. They were installed to provide flexible heating for the whole room. The ability to site the heaters high on the wall, instead of the floor, and yet still connect to the zoo’s boiler, was a real advantage. The fan convector’s strengths lie in its easy installation and manageable controls, as well as the way in which it produces heat. In terms of installation, any trained heating engineer should be able to install one because they use same pipe work, fitting procedures and heat loss calculations as radiators do. A fan convector has a heat output switch on its casing or can be remotely controlled. Either way, if the heat output switch is left on normal or boost, then the fan convector is able to come on and off with the central heating system. Better still, this means you can select one type of boiler for your heating system and pair it with either fan convectors alone, or in combination with traditional panel radiators to provide the optimum solution for each individual customer. Fan convectors produce heat using forced convection by means of a small electric fan. Inside the casing is a heat exchanger connected to a standard two-pipe central heating system, together with a small electric fan to circulate the hot air. This fan requires an electrical connection. Hot water passes through the heat exchanger, transferring heat to its aluminium fins. Cooler air is drawn in by the fan and heated as it passes over the heat exchanger, before being expelled gently back into the room. This provides a more even temperature spread and heats the room up more quickly than a conventional panel radiator. FORCED CONVECTION This deployment of forced convection means that much larger spaces can be heated up from a standing cold start very quickly because they only require five per cent of the water content of an equivalent output radiator. Radiators, by their very nature, take much longer to heat up and even then, a good ten per cent of their heat is lost heating the wall behind them. In our own independent tests, we have taken a room at 10ºC up to 25°C within 15 minutes, something no panel radiator could ever hope to achieve. This brings additional benefits in terms of how far in advance the heating needs to come on to make the rooms or space comfortable for its users. One of our recent church projects was at St Chad’s Church in Hanmer, one of the oldest churches in Wales. We sent our technical sales manager along to support the contractor with the specification because in a church of that age, the walls are very thick and the ceilings are high, making the heat loss calculation challenging and managing that heat loss with heat emitters a huge task. The church is renovating its building and additional facilities and had two brand new boilers together with six Caspian Low 120/12s sited in the Nave where most of the congregation sit for services, together with a further four Caspian Lows in other key places in the church. A small number of radiators were also installed along the side aisle walls as a means of avoiding cold spots. This church, despite its age, has no pews and so can change the space available and open itself to the local school and other organisations to use for all kinds of community events. The new heating has provided a much warmer environment for parishioners and means the heating does not need to be switched on much more than half an hour before use, saving on fuel bills. FRESH OPPORTUNITIES Domestic installers have a tremendous opportunity to cross over into the light commercial sector using the skills and customer service experience they have already gained working with domestic customers. From offices to nurseries, doctors’ surgeries, places of worship, high street businesses, leisure venues, studios and schools, by offering a flexible range of heating solutions, you can develop fresh opportunities for new business and success. This month sees the launch of Smiths latest product in the range, the Caspian Universal Concealed fan convector, to join the Caspian range of commercial fan convectors. The Caspian Universal Concealed will meet the needs of contractors and installers who require all the benefits of a fan convector, but need to hide them discreetly within the fabric of, or behind, purpose-built casing in the building they are heating. 76 NOVEMBER 2015 HEATING & PLUMBING MONTHLY WWW.HPMMAG.COM Got a story? Ring us on 01732 748041 or e-mail twood@unity-media.com enquiry number 136 Smith’s Caspian Universal Conceale is incredibly versatile with different accessories which enable it to be fitted literally anywhere


HPM November 2015
To see the actual publication please follow the link above