48 HPM 0813

HPM August 2013

Got a story? Ring us on 01732 748041 or e-mail twood@unity-media.com HEATRECOVERY Heat recovery key to improved efficiency The value of a home can increase by as much as 14% when energy efficiency and renewable measures are fitted. Any measures that can be introduced to improve energy efficiency, including heat recovery, will not only help cut running costs, but could also increase the value of a property, says Daikin UK’s Darren Manley... Research published by the Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC), entitled: ‘An investigation of the effect of Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) ratings on house prices’, has found that, for example, as much as £19,000 can be added to the value of a home in the north east of England by increasing the EPC rating from a Band D to a Band B rating. This is because prospective purchasers are now increasingly focussed on how energy efficient a property will be, in order to keep their running costs down. This is as true for those living in apartment buildings as it is for those living in large detached homes. With our climate becoming more extreme, there is also an increased demand for luxury properties to incorporate cooling for hot summer days, as well as heating for the colder months. This polarisation of temperatures can cause the energy conscious a problem, but this may be about to change. STRATEGIC DIRECTION According to DECC’s recent publication ‘The Future of heating - meeting the challenge’, 22% of the stock is defined as dense urban and the strategic direction is to develop heat networks. The introduction of widespread use of community heating powered by renewable technologies in domestic properties is ideal for the UK market with a large proportion of high density housing. As yet, this concept has not been widely embraced. However, this could be about to change, especially for those systems incorporating heat recovery. Traditionally, community heating has been limited to large scale Combined Heat and Power systems, requiring convenient location for the infrastructure within a housing development. This has historically proved difficult, not least because developers, understandably, want to use every inch of space for providing homes. And, as for retrofitting this technology, the cost and installation difficulties often prove impractical. Advances in technology mean that there are now other alternatives in the market. The industry itself has responded to the challenge by developing solutions such as Daikin Altherma Flex Type - the world’s first community heat pump solution for apartments and multiple dwelling blocks. This heat pump system for apartments and community heating aligns perfectly with the vision of a low carbon economy and offers a WWW.HPMMAG.COM highly efficient alternative to the more traditional community based heating systems, such as CHP or central boiler systems. Designed to provide heating and cooling with heat recovery for both new and existing buildings and housing blocks, it allows independent control of the heating and hot water systems within each individual home, with the whole building system powered by communal outdoor heat pump units. This system is able to heat efficiently with 48 AUGUST 2013 HEATING & PLUMBING MONTHLY heating flow temperatures of up to 80°C making it ideal for refurbishment applications where the emitter system is designed for high temperature emitters. Domestic hot water temperatures of up to 75°C are possible and the system can also provide optional cooling in conjunction with heat recovery. This feature provides additional system efficiencies, as the domestic hot water tank can be heated up to 60°C using free heat reclaimed from the cooling operation. Once an individual apartment has sufficient hot water provided by heat recovery, this reclaimed heat can be used to heat other apartments’ hot water too. This system has huge benefits over traditional community heating solutions as one inverter controlled outdoor heat pump unit can provide heating energy to up to ten individual properties. Outdoor units can be placed on a high rise roof, or to the side of a building and multiple outdoor units can be installed for larger applications. A small footprint ‘plug and play’ indoor unit, comprising the hydrobox and the domestic hot water (DHW) cylinder, is installed in each individual dwelling. REQUIRED TEMPERATURE The central outdoor unit absorbs heat freely available in the outside air and distributes it to the indoor units by refrigerant pipework. It is then further increased to the required temperature by a second cascade heat pump cycle utilising R134a refrigerant inside the hydrobox. The heat is transferred to water ready to be circulated to the DHW cylinder or heat emitters to warm the dwelling. Where cooling is required the heat pump works in reverse and the cascade cycle is bypassed to provide chilled water that can be circulated to fan coil units. Connection between outdoor and indoor units is made by small diameter refrigerant piping avoiding the need for larger diameter primary flow and return pipework making retrofitting easier. The system does not need a shared flue duct and avoids the associated issues of otherwise fitting condensing boilers onto centralised shared flue ducts. The drive towards improving energy efficiency has led manufacturers to develop more ways to reduce running costs, and the use of renewable energy combined with heat recovery is now a realistic proposition for the UK market. enquiry number 135 Daikin’s roof mounted outdoor Flex Type units


HPM August 2013
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