42 HPM 0813

HPM August 2013

Got a story? Ring us on 01732 748041 or e-mail twood@unity-media.com RENEWABLES Coming soon, but what is the ErP? The ErP (Energy related Products) Directive is due to be implemented in 2015 – so the heating industry needs to prepare. Baxi’s head of product and channel management, Simon Osborne, tells us more... The ErP (Energy related Products) Directive consists of new regulations to help the EU achieve its 20-20-20 target to reduce energy use by 20% and increase the share of renewable energies by 20% by 2020. The ErP Directive will eventually affect all products that have an impact on energy during use so appliances such as boilers, water heaters and renewable technologies are covered, but also some less obvious items such as windows. It applies to all 30 countries in the European Economic Area - and will be applied in the same way at the same time. The ErP covers all heating and hot water products, but in terms of boilers, the scope of the ErP is limited to domestic and commercial products with an output lower than 400kW. It is likely to have a major impact in many European markets, as standard efficiency products (and some lower performing high efficiency products) will essentially be banned. There are actually two directives within the ErP, which will be supplemented by regulations to define how they will be implemented. The first, Ecodesign, sets the minimum energy performance and environment criteria for energy related products, which must be fulfilled in order for products bearing a CE mark to be placed on the market. SPACE HEATING EFFICIENCY Under the directive, from 2015 the seasonal space heating efficiency for gas and oil domestic boilers below 70kW cannot fall below 86%, and for those between 70kW and 400kW the useful efficiency at 100% of the rated heat output cannot fall below 86%, and the useful efficiency at 30% of the rated heat output cannot not fall below 94%. As a comparison, heat pump space heaters (excluding low-temperature heat pumps) will have an efficiency requirement of 100%. The other aspect is Energy Labelling. Every product below 70kW (though this needs to be confirmed in the final document) will require an energy label. Each product will be classified with an efficiency band (G to A+++) and, as a guide, a high efficiency boiler will generally be in the A band, heat pumps will be in the A+ or A++ band. A Stirling engine mCHP product will be in the A+ band. The details on the label will be product specific and will identify the efficiency band for heating and (where relevant) hot water production, and the sound power level. This will be a similar format to the energy labelling on white goods, something consumers will already WWW.HPMMAG.COM be familiar with and, therefore, much less of a hurdle for installers when they come to explain it to customers. There will also be an energy label for the installed system. This depends upon the components used in the installation (for example, there might be a boiler, a heat pump and room controls) and must be completed by the installer, or potentially the system specifier - and requires calculations to be made. Therefore, installers can use the opportunity to sell packages rather than just boilers. So what does this mean for installers? Essentially an installer will only be able to purchase and, therefore, install an ErP compliant product which will lead to greater overall system efficiency post implementation. There are however a few exclusions such as those to be used in shared flue applications. In this situation, it is still possible to replace the boiler with a standard efficiency one. Ultimately the installer will need to be aware of what he can and cannot install legally and be comfortable with the installation requirements of high efficiency products. Being customer facing, it will be the installer’s role to help end users understand their options and the choices that they have when it comes to specification. When it comes to labelling, consumers will already be familiar with the labelling style thanks to the prevalence of a similar system on white goods and now tyres. Where installers may need further support however is in calculating the full package details which will comprise a series of calculations based on the varying components of the system i.e. boiler, heat pump, controls etc. 42 AUGUST 2013 HEATING & PLUMBING MONTHLY The calculations will generate a system efficiency figure which must then be added onto the ‘package label’ to complete the installation. As further details about the ErP and energy labelling becomes available, installers can rest assured that manufacturers will provide training pre implementation and support will be available throughout. It is also important to note, that installers are able to continue to install a non-compliant product if it entered into the distribution supply chain i.e. the wholesaler, before the implementation stage. What does this mean for manufacturers? The ErP will have a major impact on the marketplace as many boiler manufacturers could be left with a whole raft of product solutions that simply don’t meet the requirements of the ErP. The UK, however, is perhaps better placed than any other European nation, to cope with these changes, as a result of our experience through the implementation of Part L of the Building Regulations. The process will take some considerable time to complete as all products must be tested and checked for compliance. For manufacturers however, it is not only a question of compliance, each product will also require an independent technical datasheet and both an energy label and package label. ENTIRE HEATING SOLUTIONS Yet most importantly, the ErP presents an opportunity for industry as manufacturers see the directive as a means to promote entire heating solutions and packages rather than just single elements. As such, manufacturers have the ability to define system efficiency from the outset, offering boilers with integrated controls and combined with other technologies such as solar will not only increase system efficiency, but also potentially make it more marketable. The first wave of changes has already come into effect and from January 1, 2013, all stand alone pumps must comply with the new ErP guidelines, and have an energy efficiency index lower than 0.27. Needless to say, there are changes ahead but there is no need to be concerned. Come 2015, and the expected full implementation of the directive, industry is expected to not only be ready for the change but helping to drive it. Manufacturers are already working hard to embrace the changes and will increasingly be looking at ways to support installers on the job and to ensure its ongoing success. enquiry number 132 Weather compensation: all aspects of the installation will be considered, including controls


HPM August 2013
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