084 HPM 0415

HPM April 2015

Got a story? Ring us on 01732 748041 or e-mail twood@unity-media.com PIPES,PUMPS,VALVES&FITTINGS Install a filter to ensure best practice Whether you are working on a standard sized domestic heating system or a larger domestic one, it is important to take steps to address the issue of dirt and minimise the damage it can cause. Roger Williams, sales director UK for Spirotech, discusses the issues associated with dirt and advises installers on protecting heating systems in larger properties... During the lifetime of a heating system, the condition of the water circulating within it will deteriorate causing the system to work less efficiently. If left untreated, dirt in a system will lead to breakdowns and heavy wear and tear of system components, especially modern pumps, the efficiency of which can be more susceptible to dirt. The dirt that accumulates consists of corrosion particles, which are present in most systems throughout the UK. These are drawn to the magnetic fields around pumps and valves, plus limescale is also a problem in certain areas. Other dirt particles are pumped around the system and eventually gather in critical components; not good news for a heating system, or the person paying the energy bill and service costs. COMPLYING WITH REGULATION To comply with Part L of the Building Regulations, it is compulsory to clean and flush the system when fitting a new boiler and to add a suitable chemical inhibitor during the final fill. It is not, however, compulsory to check the quality of the system water, something a number of boiler manufacturers are now starting to ask for before they will issue the warranty. Flushing the system will go some way to removing existing dirt, however, it is impossible to remove all the dirt in this way, no matter how well the powerflush has been carried out. Dirt removal and the prevention of future build up is especially important when new boilers are installed on old systems, or when new energy pumps are installed as a replacement for a broken one, as any dirt left can cause damage and early breakdown. MOST EFFECTIVE SOLUTION In your typical domestic property, it is best practice to install a filter, with the most effective solution being a magnetic dirt separator. However, for larger systems the solutions for dirt removal have to date been limited, with heating professionals facing two main options. The first is to install two, three or more 28mm domestic dirt separators in parallel, with all the necessary, time consuming and labour-intensive pipework alterations. The second option would be the installation of a full commercial unit, which can often cost WWW.HPMMAG.COM The graph shows the scope of filters, such as the one pictured right, in extracting even the smallest particles from heating systems in excess of £1,000. Neither of which provide installers or end-users with an attractive option until now. Recognising this as an issue for installers that often work on heating systems in more sizeable residential properties with five or six-bedrooms or light commercial applications, including small office and retail units, Spirotech set about devising a more cost effective and less time intensive solution. This has become even more critical with the current common practice of replacing old large cast iron boilers with modular cascade systems, which would be much more susceptible to the impact of dirt within the system. 84 APRIL 2015 HEATING & PLUMBING MONTHLY enquiry number 161


HPM April 2015
To see the actual publication please follow the link above